Monday, July 4, 2011

I had a thought which led to a question

As I was enduring my run this morning I was pondering about whether I should go back and fix a chapter on my current WIP or just keep writing. I know, it's the age old question. Then a thought occurred to me.

Since I'm a pantser I shouldn't go back and rewrite a scene, because I'm not sure that scene will even stay in the novel. So I decided not to rewrite sections, instead I write notes on what I should change or add.

This lead me wonder. If I were a planner would I be more apt to edit as I go?

So here's my question:

Do you think there is any correlation between being a pantser or a plotter and how you write your first draft?

BTW: Happy 4th of July

13 comments:

Ruth Josse said...

First of all, the fact that you said you were Enduring your run cracked me up. Pretty much sums it up:)

I have to go back and fix. If I don't, I feel like the story is unraveling behind me as I try and thread together the new stuff. I don't think it has anything to do with whether I am a panster or a plotter, just my OCDness at play.

....Petty Witter said...

Not familiar with the term pantser I admit I had to google it.

Kelley Vitollo said...

I'm a mixture of a plotter and panster. It depends on how big the fix is on if I go back now, or just write notes and fix later.

Jolene Perry said...

I'm a total pantser, I rarely plot, BUT I fix as I go. That doesn't mean it's shiny and pretty at the end, but I always crit a chapter before I just jump in and start writing again, it helps get me in the mood of my book.
Interesting question...

Robyn Campbell said...

*raises hand* Panster here. *drops head* Sometimes I fix as I write, if it tells me to. But I usually write on. And fix later. I think most pansters do that, Patti.

I skipped enduring my run today and opted to swim instead. Much better. *wink*

Stephanie Faris said...

Hmmmm... It's all in what works for you. I think for us "pantsers," we just do better to get it all out there. I'm not averse to rewriting entire scenes or the whole book when I find a better way to do it later. But for the most part I end up going through and reworking things, but not completely rewriting.

Misha said...

I think there's a definite correlation. In fact, I know there is.

I used to be a plotter who edited everything I wrote three or four times until I realized how much I was preventing myself from actually finishing.

So I gave up on the plotting idea and pantsed my way through all the way to revisions without going back to edit.

:-)

Monica B.W. said...

Maybe? I mean, I am a plotter, and I edit as I go. And it has been good for me. But you know? Sometimes pantsers say they are jealous of us plotters, but I think it has its downs, too. Sometimes when you don't program what is going to happen, the character's reactions are more natural than if everything is sort of scheduled to take place, you know? Am I making any sense? LOL

Jessica Nelson said...

Possibly. I'm a pantser and edit as I go, though I haven't really cut too many scenes before. I think plotters probably don't edit as they go, but after they finished? Not sure...

Heidi Willis said...

Interesting conundrum!! I'm definitely a plotter, and if I think I need to change something significant in what I've already written, I've got to go back and do it before I write anything else and screw up what comes next.

My school advocates pantsing it though. Who would have thought?

Lynn said...

Well I thought I was a plotter but I am enjoying just writing the first draft, getting it down with no inhibitions. I'll write notes in the margin but do not plan to act on them until the first draft is completed. The writing process is so unique to us all!

Medeia Sharif said...

I plot and I still itch to go back and change something in the draft. If it's something small, I might do it. If it's something big, I might have to tweak the outline.

Elana Johnson said...

Absolutely! I'm a complete discovery writer, and I have to take notes as I go, especially if I'm writing from two POV's. I want them to be distinct, and I can't let them bleed into each other.

I simply take notes as I go. That way, when I get to the end of the novel, I know what to look for during revision. I also (FINALLY) know the beginning, middle, and end, and can evaluate each scene during revisions to see if it's needed or not.

Sure, I do some editing as I go. Tightening of sentences, character stuff, emotions, etc. But I don't completely rewrite scenes or chapters during drafting.